Former Samsung Executive Details Google's Pushback in Antitrust Case

Adgully Bureau |

In a significant antitrust trial against Google, a former executive from Samsung Electronics' venture capital arm revealed that pressure from Google hindered the expansion of mobile app developer Branch Metrics' software on Samsung smartphones.

Patrick Chang, who formerly worked at Samsung Next, advocated for the integration of Branch Metrics' software into Samsung's Android smartphones. However, he encountered resistance due to concerns raised by Google. Branch Metrics had to limit some of its software functions to address Google's complaints, ensuring that its in-app searches did not link to the web.

Chang also highlighted opposition from wireless carriers like AT&T, which sell Android phones and were influenced by Google's dominance.

The U.S. Justice Department presented evidence suggesting that Google pays substantial sums, around $10 billion annually, to smartphone manufacturers and wireless carriers in exchange for making its software the default option, thereby maintaining its search monopoly.

During cross-examination, Google's attorney questioned Chang about whether Samsung's reluctance to adopt Branch's software might also be attributed to its perceived inefficiency, with few users clicking on the links offered by Branch.

This testimony occurred during the fourth week of a lengthy trial, during which the Justice Department sought to demonstrate that Google engaged in anticompetitive practices to maintain its search and advertising monopoly. Google contends that its business practices comply with the law.